News

CFP: Design & Environment: An intensive, interdisciplinary, and output-oriented workshop

Posted on : September 6, 2017

Call for Papers Design & Environment An Intensive, Interdisciplinary, and Output-Oriented Workshop Wednesday 28 February & Thursday 1 March 2018 University of Leeds Abstract deadline: 13 October 2017 3 to 5 page essay deadline: 12 January 2018 Keynotes Wendy Gunn (Senior Research Fellow at the Research[x]Design Research Group, Department of Architecture, KU Leuven) And Clare Rishbeth (Lecturer in Landscape Architecture at the Department of Landscape, The University of Sheffield) Theme This two-day workshop seeks to critically rethink how design and environment inform each other. Architects, designers, and environmental scholars from a range of disciplines are committed to sustainability. However, the relationships between these fields of inquiry and production are not self-evident. How are design and environment intertwined, or when does environment become design and vice versa? It has long been recognised that spatial planning and design are not just matters of aesthetics or convenience, but can have major consequences for how an environment functions in social terms. The examples of destructive socio-spatial segregation are ample, as are those of fragmented ecosystems. The workshop invites reflections on the troubled relationship between design and environment beyond conventional “Design for the Environment” (DfE) frameworks (focussing on the environmental impact of products or processes)...

Click to read the full article
Read More

The Simplification of Climate Engineering Connotations

Posted on : May 16, 2017

Until quite recently, climate engineering was a consideration for the marges. It was discussed almost exclusively by scientists – and almost always the same small set of scientists. Slowly though, this has begun to change. When I first started to engage with the concept of climate engineering (or geoengineering as it is often called), any reference to my work when speaking to other people or writing about it was always a prompt for having to explain the entire endeavour, and in particular its intimate connection to anthropogenic climate change). Lately, slowly but surely, things are changing – although I still at times feel the need to comprehensively define what climate engineering is and what it stands for (see below). Sure, people’s eyes still often glaze over when I utter the terms ‘geoengineering’, ‘climate engineering’, or ‘deliberate climate intervention’. Sure, the vast majority of people have little inkling of what climate engineering actually entails – though this is in no small part due to definitional inaccuracies and lack of clarity. Sure, those who do have some knowledge of it typically ask me if I am aware that climate engineering is, in fact, a horrible idea, and often want to know what...

Click to read the full article
Read More

SAF – Stories of the Anthropocene Festival

Posted on : October 18, 2016

The KTH Environmental Humanities Laboratory, in collaboration with the Rachel Carson Center and the Nelson Institute Center for Culture, History, and Environment at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, presents Stories of the Anthropocene Festival (SAF), which will take place on the 26, 27, 28 and 29 of October 2016 in Stockholm, Sweden. We invited scholars, artists, writers, filmmakers, and activists to propose a single story that could represent or encapsulate the Anthropocene. The stories presented and performed will be from all possible angles and scales, rejecting any pre-constituted hierarchy between fiction and non-fiction, local and global, scientific and vernacular, academic and pop. Deeply rooted in the storytelling tradition of the humanities, SAF seeks to reclaim the power of narratives to shape and understand the world beyond the dualities of possible/impossible, material/immaterial, real/imaginary. The Anthropocene has developed a dual career, firstly as a geological term and secondly as a cultural term. It is open whether geologists will find the precise stratum where the Anthropocene began, and if the geological community will agree on the Anthropocene as a new epoch in Earth history. In many fields of the humanities and social sciences and also in the public, however, the Anthropocene is already...

Click to read the full article
Read More

Watch the Future of Wild Europe: Video Recordings

Posted on : September 23, 2016

The plenary sessions of the Future of Wild Europe conference were recorded by the University of Leeds. So grab your notebook and watch these amazing key note lectures and roundtable discussions, over and over again! Céline Cousteau Guðni Th. Jóhannesson Rewilding on Film Elizabeth De Loughrey Discussion: Clare Lagier, Vikas Lakhani Toby Aykroyd, Franz Krause, Thierry Lefebvre, Nadya Vangelova Dolly Jørgensen Discussion: Stefania Barca, Richard Kerridge and Kate Rigby Charles Foster Conference Opening & Jamie Lorimer

Click to read the full article
Read More

Crossing the Line

Posted on : July 23, 2016

The peer-reviewed journal Geohumanities just published a personal essay called "Crossing the Line, or, Death at the Equator" by Jesse Peterson for their Practices & Curations section. Reflecting on the crossing the line ceremony, the essay questions coping with loss and death through transcendence. View the link for the full abstract and article or contact Jesse for more information.

Click to read the full article
Read More

BBC Radio 2 – Jeremy Vine’s Being Human, Chris Packham: What Makes Us Human?

Posted on : May 6, 2016

Wildlife expert Chris Packham joins us for What Makes Us Human and shares his chillingly honest view on what we are as humans in the 21st Century BBC Radio 2 - Jeremy Vine’s Being Human, Chris Packham: What Makes Us Human?.Source: BBC Radio 2 – Jeremy Vine’s Being Human, Chris Packham: What Makes Us Human?

Click to read the full article
Read More
Lego Goes Here