Design & Environment: Open keynote lecutres

Theme Format Schedule Registration Open Keynotes Travel & Accommodation

Design & Environment
An intensive, interdisciplinary, and output-oriented workshop

 

Design & Environment Keynotes by Wendy Gunn and Clare RishbethUniversity of Leeds
Wednesday 28 February & Thursday 1 March 2018
3 to 5 page essay deadline: 12 January 2018
For queries and special interest please contact a.vandam@leeds.ac.uk

Open keynote lectures

Thursday 1 March, SEE Room 8.119, University of Leeds.

Co-hosted by the School of Earth and Environment, the School of English, and the Leeds Humanities Research Institute.

 

10.00-11.15h

Beyond Nostalgia: design for the urban encounter

Keynote by Clare Rishbeth, Lecturer in the Department of Landscape, University of Sheffield.

In this presentation I will examine the role of landscape architect as researcher – the borderlands between academia and practice. I suggest that design curiosity and practice shape a certain flexibility and looseness that is well suited to the interdisciplinary research challenges of current times. My own work is on migration and place, thinking about design for the urban encounter in contexts of high diversity. I present the questions, approaches and key findings from three of my recent projects, including ‘The Bench Project’ and ‘#refugeeswelcome in parks’.

Clare Rishbeth is a lecturer in the Department of Landscape, University of Sheffield. Her research focuses on migration histories and the experiential qualities of place, developing a landscape specific contribution within a broad field of literature encompassing belonging and isolation, conviviality, racism and transnational connections. Her approach and social values are focused on profiles of marginalisation – shaped by intersections of ethnicity, class and gender – set against the civic ethos of properly public space. She has led a range of research projects on these themes, most recently the AHRC funded ‘The Bench Project’ (2015) and ‘#refugeeswelcome in parks’ (2017).

 

11.30-12.45h

An Anthropological Inquiry By Design Towards Improving Indoor Air Quality Within Hospital Settings

Keynote by Wendy Gunn, Senior Research Fellow, Dept. of Architecture, Research[x]Design Group, KU Leuven.

Co-authored with Dirk Saelens, Professor of Energy in Buildings, Dept. of Civil Engineering, KU Leuven; and Ann Heylighen, Research Professor, Dept. of Architecture, Research[x]Design Group, KU Leuven.

Our current research is concerned with affects and effects that architectural and engineering design processes and future making practices have on patients, hospital staff and visitors who engage with hospital settings. This has been underpinned by a longer-term aim to understand how people’s sensory experience and perceptual acuity can be involved during architectural and engineering design processes and future making practices. Central to this inquiry, we argue it is necessary to build relations between the movements of designing and movements of ongoing intra-action (Barad 2003). In the fields of architectural and engineering design, what kind of forms and material practices could we imagine being made in the future based upon this proposition? One proposition, for example, might be to consider instigating a dialogue between qualitative and quantitative methodologies towards improving indoor air quality operating across the fields of energy, health and environment. From this positioning, the principle research question to be addressed in the lecture is: How could collaborative research concerning patients’, staff’s and visitors’ sensorial experience and perceptual acuity be involved in architectural and engineering design processes and future making practices concerned with improving hospital indoor air quality?

Wendy Gunn is a Senior Research Fellow in the Research[x]Design Group at the Department of Architecture, KU Leuven, Belgium. She was awarded a Senior Research Fellowship from KU Leuven Research Council to collaborate with Prof Ann Heylighen (architecture and design) and Prof Dirk Saelens (building physics). Her current research seeks to leverage scientific research involving patients’ sensorial experience and perceptual acuity to inform future design of measurement experiments towards improving indoor air quality within hospital healthcare settings. Research has involved the co-design of a research framework for the wider research project: An Anthropological Inquiry by Means of Design Towards Improving Indoor Air Quality Within Hospital Settings, and a pilot study Combining Quantitative and Qualitative Methodologies and Methods in Data Collection of Air Quality (Perceived and Measured) within Hospital Healthcare Settings. As a researcher, she has cross-disciplinary expertise in architecture, anthropology and design and significant experience of conducting collaborative research as part of interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary design teams involving both the private and public sectors. Central to her research is a close connection between theory and practice, research and teaching.

 

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